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May 2014

Turn Your Pet’s Coat into a Coat for Yourself!

 by danielle on 31 May 2014 |
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Have you ever been cuddling your fluffy cat or dog and thought what a wonderful coat their fur would make?   Historically, the Native American Salish tribe used the fleece of the extinct Salish Wool Dogs in their designs. Modern day craftspeople are now using the fur of cats and dogs of today to create interesting and unique designs.   Image credit    Hair of the Dog Designer Yarns is one of a number of companies that allow you to send in your pet’s fur to have it spun into wool.   The company was founded when Nancy, the owner of Afghan hound, Chili, noticed all the fine quality hair she was collecting when she groomed him. She was sure she could make something useful out of it and so learned to spin yarn and knit.   A grocery bag full of fur is generally enough for a project such as a woven purse or dog yarn hat.   Breeds such as the American Eskimo, Cow, Newfoundland, Golden Retriever, Malamute, Maltese, Samoyed, Husky, Saluki, Poodle and shepherds have fur ideal for weaving. Long-haired cats, including Persians, Ragdolls and Himalayans, have similarly useful fur.   Image credit Surprisingly, dog and cat wool is usually about 70% lighter than wool derived from sheep or llamas -  and it's far warmer.   But does dog fur smell? No, says Nancy, as dog yarn is thoroughly cleaned and de-odorised in the cleaning process. Apparently dogs are known to still be able to sniff out the smell of another dog no matter how thoroughly it is treated however - so beware!    Dog and cat fur can be dyed just like regular wool to create any colour garment or accessory you desire.   Image credit   Image credit Doumé Jalat-Dehen is another spinner who works with pet fur to create versatile clothing. Jalat-Dehen’s work has been captured by photographer Erwan Fichou’s series Dogwool, which displays owners with their dogs wearing canine fur clothes manufactured in her studio.  Books such as Crafting with Cat Hair by Kaori Tsuaya help interested readers create their own cat fur fabric and handicrafts and home.    Image credit   Feature Image credit

Surfs Up! Pets Who Love the Waves

 by danielle on 31 May 2014 |
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Many dogs can’t be stopped from diving into the ocean when they arrive at the beach. Nowadays, some dogs love to surf the waves as well.   Dog surfing has become a popular activity amongst pet owners in coastal regions. Dogs can be trained to balance on boards by themselves or with their owners, or even with other dogs in what is known as ‘tandem surfing’.   Image credit Image credit   Competitions take place annually in California and Florida. The Loews Coronado bay Resort Surf Dog Competition is the largest dog surfing competition in the world, with the first event taking place in 2006.    Dogs are judged on their overall certainty on the board, the size of the waves surfed, and their ride length. Entrants participate in ten minute heats where they attempt to catch as many waves as possibly.   Image credit   Image credit   Usually over 50 dogs partake in the tournament of all different sizes and breeds. At the 2012 competition three Guinness World Records were broken, including a new record of the most dogs photographed on a surfboard.   Another popular competition takes place on Huntington Beach, California called ‘Surf City Surf Dog’.   Image credit  Image credit   Dog surfing, whilst never as popular as it is today, has a long history. Surfing dogs were documented in California and Hawaii in the 1920s and in the 1930s. Night Hawk, a terrier, was captured in the silent film 'On The Waves in Waikiki' with his owner Phillip K. Auna surfing on a wooden board. Night Hawk was even able to perform the ‘hang ten’ surfing maneuver.   Image credit   Image credit   Dogs aren’t even the only pets who enjoy the waves. In Lima, Peru tortoiseshell cat Nicolasa loves surfing with her owner Domingo Pianezzi.   He discovered his kitten’s passion when she unexpectedly jumped on his board as he took off on San Bartolo beach. Since then, they have enjoyed many sunny days on the water together.    Feature image credit

Unlikely Animal Friendships That Make Your Heart Melt 2

 by danielle on 31 May 2014 |
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Dogs and cats just can't stop making friends! Here are some more unusual animal besties pets have made.  The Wild Boar and The Jack Russell   Image credit   The Dahlhaus family found a piglet starving in a field in southwest Germany. Taking pity, they took the tiny wild boar baby home. When he met their Jack Russell Terrier puppy Candy, the two embarked on an unlikely friendship. The pair enjoy running around together and playing outside. Image credit   The piglet, called ‘Manni’ has recovered well and will either stay with the Dahlhaus family or move to a wildlife park.      Image credit   The Kitten and the Crow   Image credit Elderly Massachusetts couple Wallace and Ann Collito discovered the strangest of relationships unfolding in their backyard. A little stray cat they called Cassie appeared outside sometimes. She may have been abandoned by her owners, but she was well taken care of.   Image credit A crow, ‘Moses’ as he came to be known, fed the kitten worms and bugs and kept her away from the street. When Cassie decided to start sleeping inside the Collitos’ house Moses waited outside every morning for the cat to run outside and join him in play.    Image credit The Greyhound and the Owl Image credit Long-eared owl Shrek and 6-month-year old Greyhound Torque bonded at an animal centre after Shrek was taken away from her mother at three days old for her own safety. Keepers were afraid her mother might eat her own clutch if she became stressed which the species is known to do. Shrek went home with head falconer John Picton and his dog Torque.   Shrek is allowed to wander the lounge room and she and Torque regularly curl up and watch television together in the evenings. During the day, outdoors at the Ringwood Raptor and Reptile Centre, they sit together with Torque vigilantly guarding his young feathered friend.     Image credit When Shrek grows up she will be used as a display owl at fetes and open days so the public can see the rare bird variety first hand.  The Cheetah and the Shepherd   Image credit Anatolian Shepherd Alexa and Cheetah Sahara have been friends for life. They became best buddies as cub and puppy at Cincinnati Zoo and eventually participated in the zoo’s Cat Ambassador Program.   Image credit   In conjunction with the Cheetah Conservation Fund, the program seeks to educate South African and Namibian farmers how the shepherd dogs can be used to protect livestock from cheetahs without shooting the big cats and reducing numbers of an already endangered species. The idea is to show the farmers that cheetahs have a healthy respect for dogs like Alexa and such dogs have no fear of the spotted cats.    Image credit Image credit  

The Side Effects of ProHeart Prevention Tablets

 by simone on 30 May 2014 |
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Heartworm disease is the leading cause of death in dogs so preventing it is at the top of the priority list for any dog lover. Heartworm is carried by mosquitoes so infections are very easily spread. An untreated worm infestation will damage your dog's heart and respiratory tract and can lead to heart failure. Thankfully, there are easy and very effective preventative treatments available such as ProHeart. ProHeart comes in tablet form and is administered once a month to dogs over 4 weeks of age. There are different dosages corresponding to your dog’s weight. As long as the correct dosage is given as directed, then your little bundle of four-legged joy can continue to bound along happily free of any heartworm trouble.  Before starting any heartworm prevention course you will need to consult your vet. This is a great way to confirm your dog’s weight and correct dosage, but more importantly, your dog will need to be checked to see if heartworm is already present. There can be severe reactions, similar to toxic shock, if preventative medication is given to dogs already infected. Also, adult worms that die may remain in the heart, lungs or pulmonary artery and interrupt or obstruct functionality. ProHeart is a preventative measure and does not treat existing heartworm infections.  Heartworm Heartworm inhabit the animal's lungs, heart and pulmonary arteries causing tissue inflammation, blood clotting, thickening of blood vessel walls, heart failure or death. Heartworm is transmitted by mosquitoes. When an infected mosquito bites your dog, the heatworm larvae (microfilariae) are transferred and migrate through the dog's tissue and circulatory system to the lungs, heart and pulmonary arteries. There the larvae feed on blood and grow to maturity. The signs of a heartworm infection include coughing, shortness of breath, respiratory sounds, fainting, lethargy, weight loss, blood present in the saliva or mucus, abdominal swelling, vomiting and loss of appetite. ProHeart ProHeart’s active ingredient is moxidectin which will paralyse and kill any parasitic larvae that has infected the dog during the previous month. The dosage of moxidectin contained in the tablets is low and therefore side effects are very rare. It is safe to use ProHeart on all sizes and breeds, puppies older than 4 weeks and breeding dogs. The recommended dose of moxidectin in ProHeart of 3 mcg/kg (1.36 mcg/lb) body weight was 100% effective in preventing the development of a one month-old heartworm infection.  Consult your vet before treating with ProHeart any sick, debilitated, elderly, underweight dogs or those that have a history of weight loss and allergies.  As with any medication, there is the potential for unpleasant side effects or adverse drug reactions for dogs that have an individual sensitivity or allergy. Testing has shown that ProHeart is extremely safe and well tolerated when administered as directed.  Sensitive Breeds Some dog breeds have a mutation in the multi-drug resistance gene (MDR1) making them more sensitive to moxidectin. This gene mutation occurs mostly in breeds such as Collies, Long-haired Whippets, Australian Shepherds, McNab, English and German Shepherds, Shetland Sheepdogs and Silken Windhounds. ProHeart has been found suitable and safe for use on these breeds. The only way to know whether your dog is affected by the MDR-1 mutation is for a vet to run tests. If you know your dog has the mutation, than consult your vet before starting any heartworm prevention.  Any adverse side effects that do arise are usually a result from an incorrect dosage being administered or hypersensitivity. If you notice any of the following reactions, take your dog to the vet immediately: Lethargy  Loss of appetite or thirst Vomiting Diarrhoea  Hives Depression Excessive Saliva Ataxia (uncoordinated movements) Difficulty or laboured breathing Oedema (fluid retention and swelling) Anaphylaxis (allergic reaction) Low body temperature Disorientation Trembling or muscle twitching Dilation of the pupils Blindness Coma Heartworm disease is the number one killer of dogs and ProHeart is a trialled and tested preventative treatment approved for dogs of all sizes and breeds, puppies, breeding and stud dogs. It’s an effective and easy tablet given each month to ensure that your dog remains protected.  Feature image credit  

Celebrity Pets: Lassie

 by danielle on 30 May 2014 |
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Lassie is one of the most iconic dog characters of all time – but who was the face behind the famous name? Said to have had the most spectacular canine career in film history, Pal was the Rough Collie actor that played the first and defining Lassie. Despite Lassie being female, Pal was in fact a male and earned the role through a convoluted series of events.   Image credit   Born at Glamis Kennels in North Hollywood on June 4, 1940, Pal had a fine pedigree, with ancestry that can be traced back to the nineteenth century and notable collies such as ‘Old Cockie’. However, he was considered a poor specimen of his breed due to his large eyes and the white blaze on his forehead and so he was sold as a pet-quality dog. He came into the possession of Howard Peck who struggled with the rambunctious pup in spite of being an animal trainer. He despaired of Pal’s uncontrollable barking and determination to chase motorcycles. Frustrated, he took the dog to fellow trainer Rudd Weatherwax, hoping he would be able to stop the behavior. Weatherwax succeeded in part, putting the endless barking to an end, but couldn’t get rid of Pal’s obsession with motocyles. Disappointed, Peck agreed to give Weatherwax Pal instead of paying him for his services. Weatherwax decided to give Pal to his friend, but soon asked for him back when heard they were looking for a star of MGM’s film adaptation of Eric Knight’s 1940 novel Lassie Come Home. Weatherwax had a feeling Pal was the dog for the part and bought him for $10.00. Later on, when Pal became the star of the dog world, his original owner Peck tried to reclaim ownership of the dog, but Weatherwax’s legal ownership was upheld.   Image credit  At first it had seemed Weatherwax was wrong. Pal competed amongst 1,500 other dogs for the part of Lassie and was rejected. The reasons cited: he was a male, his eyes were over-large, his head was too flat, and his sizeable, white blaze was unsightly. Instead, a prize-winning female show collie was picked – but at least, as a consolation, Pal’s owner Weatherwax was hired to train her.  When filming of Lassie Come Home began in 1943, it was decided to take advantage of the spectacular flooding of the San Joaquin River to make an attention-grabbing sequence. The show Collie refused to enter the rampant floodwaters and Weatherwax offered for his dog, Pal, to perform the scene. Pal performed magnificently. He swum across the river, hauled himself out, lay down without shaking and pretended to attempt to crawl forwards before finally lying on his side with exhaustion, unable to go on. Director Fred M. Wilcox was so moved by the dog’s acting he had tears in his eyes.   Image credit   It was decided immediately Pal was to take the starring role and the show Collie was dismissed. MGM executives were so impressed with Pal they upgraded the production to an ‘A film’ rather than a simple children’s black and white movie and threw behind it full publicity support. In an amazing action for a film studio, the first six weeks of filming were ordered to be reshot to include Pal in all the scenes, this time in Technicolor. Pal never faltered. He rarely required more than one take to get his performance just right. Lassie Come Home was an amazing success and more MGM Lassie films followed: Son of Lassie, Courage of Lassie, Hills of Home, The Sun Comes Up, Challenge to Lassie and The Painted Hills. After seven films, and enormous success, MGM decided to bring the Lassie series to end – but Weatherwax was certain Lassie still had a future and negiotiated that instead of being given $40,000 in back pay owed to him by the studio he be awarded the Lassie name and trademark. The studio agreed and Pal and his trainer travelled around America performing shows at department stores, rodeos and dog shows. When television produced Robert Maxwell suggested the idea of a Lassie television show, Weatherwax and he created a story of a boy and his dog living on a struggling farm.   Pal was left to decide on the boy that was to be his on-screen companion. Three candidates stayed at Weatherwax’s Hollywood home for a week and he warmed strongly to 11-year-old Tommy Rettig and the boy was chosen for the role on the dog’s decision. When the pilot episodes were played CBS was impressed and signed up the show at once - but Pal’s age was beginning to show. His son, Lassie Junior, took over the role, but his retired father would accompany him to work every day. He had a bed on set and was referred to by the respectful title, ‘The Old Man.’ When Weatherwax asked Lassie Junior to perform a trick, Pal, on hearing the cue, would often perform the trick backstage.   Image credit Pal died at an amazing 18 years of age in 1958. Weatherwax was hit hard. Robert, his son, described his father’s despair at the loss of his dog. “He buried him in a special place on the ranch and would often visit the grave. Dad would never again watch an MGM Lassie movie. He just couldn't bear to see Pal. He didn't want to have to be reminded of just how much he loved that dog.” Child actor Jon Provost remembered Weatherwax’s affection for Pal as profound. "As young as I was, I recognized how much that dog meant to Rudd. Rudd loved that old dog as much as anyone could love an animal or person." To this day, Pal’s descendants play the role of Lassie he defined, and he remains the most iconic canine star to have ever lived.    Image credit   Feature image credit 

Throwback 'Purrs'-day: Still can't get enough of Keyboard Cat

 by wai on 29 May 2014 |
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Oh Keyboard Cat - how we love you so! And best of all - you're still releasing brand new kitty-board hits like this furry take on '96 Tears'.   Share the Keyboard Kitty love with your friends. What's your favorite Keyboard Cat jam?

Car Dog Barrier

 by wai on 29 May 2014 |
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Keep you and your family protected when you’re on the road with your dog. Our list of Car Dog Barriers offer peace of mind – and keep curious wet noses in back seat! Bergan Pet Travel Barrier A simple and elegant solution to keep your pets from poking their way to the front. The Bergan Pet Travel Barrier offers top and bottom vents to promote maximum air flow and its flexible cargo netting design fits any vehicle. It provides a functional barrier between dog and driver without providing a ‘caged’ feel. Note, if your active dog is one to jump over the barrier or if your pooch feels anxious about riding, you may want to opt for a sturdier and more enclosed option.   Get the Bergan Pet Travel Barrier here.   Tubular Vehicle Barrier  This is a great way to close off an area of your pet while still allowing him to see and access his humans up the front. The Tubular Vehicle Barrier fits most SUV and vans by creating a sturdy divider between seats and animal. The legs adjust to any height and the tubes can expand horizontally to cover any space, while the soft brace pads keep your vehicle’s interior protected and scratch free. Great for multiple dogs of varying sizes. Get the Tubular Vehicle Barrier here.   Petego Walky Guard Car Barrier For standard vehicles, the Petego Walky Guard Car Barrier attaches to your vehicles headrests to provide a sturdy barrier between front and backseats. Adjustable to fit most cars, the compact design breaks down for easy trunk storage – so it’s ready when you need it. Also works for SUVs and vans with extendable backseat headrests.  Get the Petego Walky Guard Barrier here.   Solvit Cargo Net Barrier This net barrier provides a claw proof divider for your car. The Solvit Cargo Net Barrier attaches to your vehicle and keeps your pet from leaping into the front seat or pawing at the driver’s head. The design will fit most vehicles, but as with the Bergan, if your pet is particularly active and eager, you may need to opt for a sturdier solution.    Get the Solvit Cargo Net Barrier here.   Paws 'N' Claws - Dog Barrier  Finally, the Paws N Claws Dog Barrier brings together some of the features of all the above. It features a sturdy frame design means the determined animal won’t be able to squeeze through and the claw proof mesh netting keeps eager paws and wet noses out of your hair! Available in different sizes – be sure to check your vehicle dimensions before purchasing.   Get the Paws 'N' Claws Dog Barrier here. Have you tried any of these products? Let us know your thoughts by commenting below!   

Extinct breeds: Turnspit

 by danielle on 29 May 2014 |
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Everyone knew what a Turnspit was. There were thousands in kitchens all through the kingdom. No one thought about them much. Turnspits as were as regular, and dull, as dishwashers. British people in the 16th century loved roasts. The problem was meat roasted on a spit needed to be turned constantly, and without the technology, this had to be done by hand. This was the chore of the lowliest kitchen boy until the turnspit came along.   Image credit Turnspits were dogs designed specifically to run, hamster-style, in a wheel connected by a chain to the roasting meat that spun it around. The wheels were generally placed high up on the wall, away from the fireplace, so the dogs did not overheat and faint. Also known as the ‘vernepator cur’, Latin for “the dog that turns the wheel”, the Turnspit appeared in one of the first books on dogs ever written in 1576. Even Shakespeare mentioned them in his play, The Comedy of Errors: “a curtailed dog fit only to run in a wheel.” Charles Darwin also used them as an illustration of genetic engineering, commenting, “Look at the spit dog. That’s an example of how people can breed animals to suit particular needs.”   They were not glamorous creatures. They were small, low-bodied with short crooked front legs and drooping ears. Their fur was gray and white, black or reddish brown. However, for their size, they were very strong and capable of working for hours. It is thought the modern day Welsh corgi, beloved by Queen Elizabeth, might trace some of its ancestry to the lowly, commonplace Turnspit. Forget the tradition of the modern Sunday roast – that was the day the Turnspit was usually given off to accompany the family to church. This wasn’t due to kindness or concern for their doggy souls, but their other practical use as foot warmers.   Image credit Over the years however the Turnspits use steadily declined as technology developed. By 1900, what was once the most common of dogs, had all but disappeared. The final nail in their coffin was the emergence of clock jacks, cheap spit-turning machines that took over their job entirely. Unfortunately, Turnspits were quite ugly and known for having a glum temperament, so no one wanted to have them for pets like other working breeds such as the Border Collie when dog jobs became scarce. But the turnspit is to be remembered as a hard-working canine who helped to feed our ancestors for centuries and played a largely unseen, but valuable part, in human history.    Image credit   Feature image credit  

Helping Children Cope with the Loss of a Pet

 by jaime on 28 May 2014 |
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When people make the decision to bring a dog or cat into their lives, they are welcoming that new pet as a member of the family. Unlike our family members though, dogs and cats do not have long lifespans. The impact pets can have the family dynamic is unmistakable. For adults, a pet can be a critical companion that is always there with a wet tongue and wagging tail at the end of the day.    For children, a dog or cat is a playmate and partner in crime. When the time comes that a pet passes away, the manner in which people grieve is going to differ. While adults have perhaps dealt with death in the past, many children may have their first experience with death when the family pet dies. So how can adults help children cope with the loss of a pet?    Prepare their minds Many older pets eventually leave their families through the process of euthanasia. Often referred to as "putting an animal to sleep," this concept can be very difficult for children to understand. As an adult it is easy to sympathize with the needs of an aging animal whose daily life is so hard that euthanasia is the best path.    For children however, coping with the concept of euthanasia is different. Parents should take the step of preparing their children for what will happen in the process of euthanasia. This doesn't mean sharing with them the details of the process, but rather using age-appropriate language to express the finality of euthanasia.    Be considerate of their emotions and age level, but make sure to let them know that this step is final. Their beloved pet won't wake up or return later, and unless that is clear it can create confusion in children.    Watch for signs of grief Once children have been prepared for the loss of their pet and have seen their pet for the final time, it is important to be aware of potential signs of grief. Just because the process was explained to them doesn't mean that they will easily process the loss and handle the grief. In the short term, depressed moods, acting out, or general gloominess are to expected.    What parents really need to watch for are long term signs of grief. Long term grief will differ based upon a child's age and their level of attachment to a pet, but some of the signs to watch for include:   ·         No longer interested in usual activities ·         Withdrawn from friends and family ·         Regression - particularly in relation to potty-training and bed wetting ·         Nightmares  ·         Fear of sleep  ·         Extra fixation on death     Parents that notice these signs in their children should act quickly to help their kids cope in a healthier manner. School psychologists, ministers, or counselors are all excellent sources of assistance in helping children develop better coping mechanisms.    With time comes healing The biggest mistake adults can make is belittling the connection a child had with a pet. Help them remember their lost pet fondly and reinforce the value of the human-animal bond they shared together while the pet was a member of the family. Additionally, be careful about getting new pets too soon.    Introducing a new pet into the family may leave the child feeling like their former pet is being replaced. This can lead to disinterest or even maltreatment of the new pet. Do not rush into any decision regarding a new pet until children have had time to heal first. When the time comes, adults should include children in the decision with the clear understanding that this new pet is not a replacement. Feature image credit

Dog Seat Belts

 by jaime on 28 May 2014 |
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Many of our four legged friends love accompanying their owners on car drives to exciting destinations: the park, the beach, a friends house - never the vet though! Car safety is of paramount importance to humans and the same should be extended to dogs. Dog seat belts are a great product that will protect your pooch in a potential road accident and minimize any distrubances they can sometimes cause during transit - all of which provides assurance to owners. We take a look at some dog seatbelts currently on the market.    Solvit Pet Vehicle Safety Harness   Image credit The Solvit Pet Vehicle Safety Harness is a popular product with owners and dogs alike. The device comes in four sizes fitting pets between 45-85 pounds (20-38 kgs), which should fit most dogs comfortably - although our tiniest companions will struggle! The harness is made of breathable materials with accompanying heavy duty straps and metal connectors. It also installs easily into almost any vehicle and is very easy to unclip. The good thing about the Solvit Pet Harness is that it doesn't restrict movement but still retrains your dog during sudden stopping with is very important. This product is designed to bring comfort to your dog - it's well padded preventing it from cutting into your pooch's neck or chest. Overall this is a great product that brings owners peace of mind - and even your four legged friend will enjoy wearing it!  Buy this product here.    HDP Car Harness Dog Safety Seat Belt Gear Travel System   Image credit The HDP Car Harness is a durable device that is easily adjustable allowing your pet to position themselves comfortably throughout car journeys. It has quick release buckles and effectively protects your pets whilst travelling. This product is ideal if your pet enjoys jumping around in the backseat of your vehicle as it prevents them from moving about too much, but still keeping them comfortable. It's easy to clip in and out and is particularly useful on smaller dogs like Jack Russells or on dogs with a body shape like that of a daschund - which can sometimes be a struggle finding a seatbelt or harness to fit them. This is a flexible and durable product which suits most dogs.    Buy this product here.    EzyDog Seat Belt Restraint for Dogs   Image credit   The EzyDog Seat Belt Restraint is a sturdy and reliable product. It allows dogs to be seated comfortably whilst minimizing the possibility of driving distractions. This product is designed to be used with an EzyDog harness, but it is possible to use it on its own although you may not achieve as much flexibility, depending on the size of your dog and the type of seat belts you have. What's great about this product is that it is flexible so your dog can sit up or lie down during journeys. It's also really simple to use and implement and is incredibly convenient - you can just tuck it away when you're not using it. Overall this is a great product, but it does work best in conjunction with a harness for maximum flexibilty and comfort.  Buy this product here.   Kurgo Tru-Fit Smart Dog Harness with Quick Release Buckles   Image credit   The Kurgo Tru-Fit Smart Dog Harness is a well designed and functional device that is easy to put on your dog and provides comfort from it's generously padded design. Its quick release buckles make it easy to install and with five adjustable points you can make sure your dog is extremely comfy. This is an affordable product and it's also of great quality. Another plus to this product is that it's also functional as a harness to use whilst walking and is a great tool to help train naughty pups who like to pull when out for a walk. This all round great product is diverse, comfortable and easy to use although it may not work well for very large dogs.  Buy this product here.    If you've used any of these products please leave your comments below and tell us your thoughts. Feature image credit    
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Pet Bucket Ltd is a UK registered company | Company no: 08345021 | 21 Pickford Rd. St.Albans | AL3 8RS UK Translation and Localization by Localizer