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November 2018

Help! My cat won’t stop biting me

 by yunus on 13 Nov 2018 |
1 Comment(s)
Our felines bite for a variety of reasons. It’s important to understand the root of the problem before you can address Kitty’s behavior.  Whether it’s a playful nibble or a serious clip, biting is a problem behavior in cats. Our felines bite for a variety of reasons, so it’s important to understand the root of the problem before you can address Kitty’s behavior.   From social play to a means of getting attention, biting serves a range of functions for cats. Especially in kittens, biting is used as a non-aggressive part of playtime, but this can become a problem when Kitty gets overzealous and bites too hard on a human. Biting can also be used to show dominance, however, and it’s important to distinguish between the two. Some telltale signs that your cat is challenging you for the lead role in the home include aggressive displays such as growling or hissing that accompany his biting. If your pet does this, or biting isn’t accompanied by playful behavior or cuddling, you can be sure he’s trying to show he’s in charge. Some cats also prefer a friendly nibble to meow when they want your attention. If your cat bites and then attempts to lead you to the food bowl, a door he wants to be opened or a litter box that needs cleaning, he is most likely using biting as a form of communication. Cats may also meow after a nibble if the behavior is meant to get your attention.   Whatever is causing your cat to bite, most owners agree it’s not a desirable behavior. Once you have determined the cause of Kitty’s biting, you can address the behavior. Cats that are simply trying to play will benefit from a variety of toys and new objects to investigate, such as paper bags or cardboard boxes. Playing with your cat for at least a few minutes each day using a fishing pole or other toy will also help curb his biting—as long as you don’t let him treat your hands like a toy. If your cat becomes too rough, put him in “time out” by immediately ending the game, so he will learn boundaries over time. Cats that are biting to show dominance require a more disciplined approach. Use a louder, firm tone to show your cat you are in charge at home and, if he’s not already neutered, consider getting your pet fixed, as unneutered males tend to be the most dominant cats. If your pet is simply biting to get your attention, however, the best response is to ignore him. Eventually, Kitty will learn that biting does not earn him the attention he needs and will try a different approach.   When training a cat not to bite, consistency is crucial. While biting can often be cute or playful, especially in kittens, you should never encourage this behavior. Your cat is less unlikely to understand the difference between different types of biting, so treat all biting the same by discouraging the behavior. Remember, never physically punish your cat for biting, as this can only escalate rough play or lead to fearful aggression from your pet.  

How to treat hot spots

 by yunus on 01 Nov 2018 |
No Comment
Hot spots aren’t just painful for your pet, but can also be stressful to treat.  These tips may help you. Hot spots aren’t just painful for your pet, but can also be stressful to treat. Whether they’re caused by a flea allergy or emotional distress, it’s important to get to the root of the problem so you can stop it at its source.   Hot spots are an immune response that causes parts of your dog’s skin to overproduce natural bacteria, producing red, irritated or even oozing lesions. While any pet can develop the painful condition, hot spots are most common in breeds with thick coats, pets with poor grooming and those suffering from all types of allergies. Left untreated, they can spread fast, so it’s important to address the problem as soon as you notice your pet is suffering from these irritations.   Treating the wound should be first on your list of priorities after you notice your pet is suffering from hot spots. Begin by carefully removing the hair in and around the infected area, and then disinfect the spot with diluted povidone-iodine or another antiseptic. Continue cleaning the wound as often as needed to keep it clean, dry, and pus-free—at least twice daily in the early stages of treatment. Because hot spots can spread quickly and cause fever or serious skin conditions, take your pet to the vet if his sores continue to grow after several days of at-home treatment. Be sure to prevent your companion from licking or chewing the infected area by covering it or outfitting him with an e-collar.   Once you’ve cleaned your pet’s hot spots, watch him closely to determine what’s causing the problem. Insect bites, including from fleas, can cause irritation, as can allergic reactions to everything from food to pollen, grass, or mold. Hot spots can also arise from emotional stress, such as separation anxiety, changes in living situation or even boredom. Pay attention to what seems to trigger your dog’s condition. Note any changes in his environment, such as moving house or introducing a new pet to the home, that could be causing your dog stress and if you suspect his hot spots are due to emotional upset, work to minimize upheaval from these changes. Some dogs experience hot spots as a reaction to flea bites, so groom your pet with a flea comb regularly and ensure his flea treatments are up-to-date. A good grooming routine can also help ensure your dog doesn’t suffer from hot spots. Though less common, underlying conditions, such as sciatica, can cause pets to chew on their skin above the painful spot, too.  
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