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How does the Seresto flea collar work?

 by ben on 22 Jul 2019 |
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The Seresto collar provides up to eight months of flea and tick prevention, making it one of the most convenient and cost-effective treatments on the market. With the huge range of flea and tick treatments on the market, many pet owners turn to the most convenient and cost-effective medications to fight an infestation. That’s why the Seresto collar has become thousands of consumers’ go-to solution for pest prevention. This revolutionary flea and tick treatment provides up to eight months of protection from biting pests, protecting dogs and cats from disease and giving owners peace of mind. Manufactured by time-honored veterinary science company Bayer, Seresto contains two active ingredients that fight fleas and ticks. An insecticide proven to be highly toxic to biting insects, Imidaclopridfights fleas at both their larval and adult stages. It is found in hundreds of other pet, garden, and home products and works by binding to receptors that block pathways in the nervous system of fleas and ticks. Because it is much more effective on insects’ nerve cells than mammals’, Imidacloprid has been proven to be safe for use on dogs and cats. Bravecto’s other active ingredient, Flumethrin, also attacks the nervous system of parasites, fighting fleas in their nymph, larval and adult stages. This pesticide is found in low doses in the collar and does not pose a risk to pets or to the people around them. In fact, field trials found only a small percentage of dogs and cats faced minor side effects, such as irritation, hair loss, scratching and hair discoloration around the area of the collar. Imidacloprid and Flumethrin work together to fight fleas and ticks for up to eight months, thanks to Seresto’srevolutionary design. The active ingredients are contained in a polymer matrix that slowly releases medication from the center of the collar to its surface. Seresto begins work almost immediately on contact with an animal’s fur and skin, where it forms a thin layer of protection against fleas and ticks. This odorless and non-greasy shield prevents parasites from attaching to your pet, where they can cause allergic reactions and transmit disease. And, because Seresto’ssustained release ensures a steady, low dose of medication, your pet will receive safe protection for up to eight months from each collar. Seresto is water resistant and provides effective treatment for pets that spend a great deal of time in the water and receive regular baths. The collar has been deemed safe for use on dogs seven weeks or older, cats 10 weeks or older, and comes in several doses for dogs of varying sizes. Seresto has even been found safe for pets who chew on their collars, so you can rest assured that your companion is getting the best and longest-lasting protection from fleas and ticks.

How does Nexgard work?

 by ben on 21 Jun 2019 |
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With zero hassle, each beef-flavored tasty Nexgard chew provides a full month of protection from biting pests. Made by the same company that created Frontline, Nexgard marks an innovation in flea and tick relief. Each beef-flavored, chewable treat packs a full month of protection from biting parasites, arming your do against harmful diseases, allergic reactions, and the notoriously difficult to destroy paralysis tick. Nexgard is effective in the fight against fleas and ticks thanks to its active ingredient, Afoxolaner. An insecticide and acaricide that attacks the central nervous system of invertebrates, Afoxolanerstarts to work fast to kill fleas within four hours of ingestion and continues working to provide a full month of relief from fleas and ticks. It works by targeting invertebrates’ nervous systems, rather than mammals’, making Nexgarddeadly to parasites, but safe for use on pets. Unlike other flea and tick medications, which work by entering the tissue under your dog’s skin, Nexgard enters the bloodstream directly to target pests as they bite. Afoxolaner works by selectively binding to certain pathways in invertebrates’ nervous systems. The first, known as GABA-gated (gamma-aminobutyric acid) channels, play a role in calming nerve transmissions and create an overall relaxation effect in the body. Afoxolaner disrupts these channels, causing spikes in nerve transmissions in fleas and ticks. At the same time, Afoxolaner bonds to glutamate-gated chloride channels, which help send nerve signals to other cells. By bonding with these channels, it increases nerve impulse transmissions. Together, these contribute to hyperexcitation of parasites’ nervous systems, creating an uncontrollable activity that is fatal to fleas and ticks. Because invertebrates’ nervous systems are not the same as mammals, clinical trials have found Nexgard to be safe for use in pets. Side effects observed in less than five percent of dogs tested included including vomiting, diarrhea, and dry skin—all symptoms of unrelated to Fido’s nervous system. However, if your pet has a history of epilepsy or a similar seizure disorder, talk to your veterinarian before giving him Nexgard. Nexgard has been tested and approved for use in puppies as young as eight weeks old and dogs over 4 pounds. The chews are also safe to give dogs currently taking other medications and are available in multiple doses for dogs of every size. Because it is delivered internally, Nexgard is effective for use on pets that swim and are washed regularly, saving you the hassle of messy topical treatments. Nexgard has not been evaluated for use in breeding pets, however, and should not be given to pregnant, nursing or breeding dogs. Discuss Nexgard for dogs with your veterinarian to provide your pet with powerful relief from fleas and ticks in one tasty, monthly chew.

Is Bravecto for cats safe?

 by ben on 22 May 2019 |
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Bravecto is the long-lasting topical treatment that provides 12 weeks of protection from fleas and ticks. Its active ingredient has been tested and FDA approved, so you know you’re getting safe and effective protection for your cat. The easy-to-apply, non-greasy topical formula gives your pet longer lasting protection than most leading brands, reducing the chances you miss a dose and create gaps in your pet’s protection. Its active ingredient Fluralaner has been FDA approved, so you know you’re getting safe and effective treatment for your cat. Field trials found that one dose of Bravecto killed 100 percent of fleas within 8 hours and continued fighting more than 98 percent of fleas for 12 weeks. Bravecto kills and controls four species of ticks, too, arming your cat against harmful diseases such as Lyme and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Its fast-acting, powerful formula is thanks to its active ingredient, Fluralaner, an insecticide and acaricide that attacks the nervous systems of fleas and ticks. Within hours of applying Bravecto topical treatment, the medication reaches the tissue fluids just under your cat’s skin, where it attacks parasites as they bite. But, because Fluralaner works differently on invertebrates than mammals, Bravecto’s powerful formula is safe for use on cats. Fluralaner works by disrupting two major systems in invertebrates’ bodies. The first, known as GABA-gated (gamma-aminobutyric acid) channels, play a role in calming nerve transmissions and create an overall relaxation effect in the body. Fluralaner upsets this process, causing waves of nerve signals that increase seizure activity and produce fatal effects in fleas and ticks. At the same time, Fluralanerdisruptsglutamate-gated channels, which help nerves send signals to other cells. Fluralaner opens these channels to increase transmissions, intensifying seizure activity and Bravecto’s effectiveness in the fight against fleas and ticks. Clinical trials found Bravecto caused no serious adverse reactions in cats. The most common side effects included vomiting, diarrhea, hair loss, decreased appetite, lethargy, and scabs—all symptoms unrelated from your feline’s nervous system. However, if your cat has a history of neurological abnormalities or has ever been diagnosed with a seizure disorder, you should talk to your veterinarian before using Bravecto. Bravecto has not been tested on breeding, pregnant, or nursing cats. Its long-lasting topical formula provides proven relief from fleas and ticks for up to 12 weeks, so discuss switching to Bravecto for cats with your veterinarian to kill fleas and ticks fast and providing long-lasting relief from biting pests.

Is Bravecto safe for breeding dogs?

 by ben on 11 Apr 2019 |
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It’s important to protect breeding and pregnant pets from fleas and ticks, but pet owners must choose medications wisely during this delicate stage of life. Fortunately for those favoring convenience, Bravecto chews are FDA-approved and safe for use in pregnant, breeding and nursing dogs. Pregnancy is a delicate time for dogs and their puppies, and this is especially true when it comes to picking the right flea and tick medication for your pet. While some treatments are safe for breeding animals, many should be avoided during this fragile stage of life. Fortunately for pet parents who favor convenience, Bravecto’s flea- and tick-fighting chews are approved for use in pregnant, breeding and nursing dogs. Dogs’ gestation period lasts about 63 days, but you should begin monitoring your pet’s medications as soon as you elect to start breeding her. It’s important to protect pregnant pets from disease-bearing fleas and ticks, as their immune systems may be vulnerable, but it’s equally vital to avoid flea and tick medications that can cause birth defects in puppies. While the “no” list includes many oral medications, Bravecto has been tested and approved for use in pregnant, breeding and lactating pets. While undergoing field trials, Bravecto for dogs was found to be free from life-threatening and serious side-effects. It’s active ingredient Fluralaner is FDA approved and proven to prevent flea and tick infestations for up to 12 weeks with each tasty chew. Bravecto starts to work almost immediately after your dog eats a tablet by spreading to the fluids under his skin, where Fluralanerbegins attacking fleas and ticks as soon as they bite. This disrupts certain pathways in pests’ nervous systems, causing seizures that are fatal to invertebrates. Because it is more effective on invertebrates than mammals, however, Fluralaner has been proven to be safe for your companion even during pregnancy. The most common side effects observed during field trials included diarrhea, flatulence, increased thirst and loss of appetite—all symptoms related to the gastrointestinal system, not pets’ nervous systems. Bravecto provides a full year of protection from fleas and ticks with just four tasty tablets. This protects dogs from parasite-borne illness such as Lyme and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and helps prevent pregnant pets from spreading parasites to their pups. Bravecto topical treatment is also available for owners electing to use this formula to protect their dogs from fleas and ticks during pregnancy. Bravecto chews and topical treatment are available by prescription from your veterinarian. If you think your dog is pregnant or are considering breeding your pet, talk to your vet about using Bravecto as a safe treatment for fighting fleas and ticks throughout pregnancy and nursing.

Is Bravecto safe for dogs?

 by ben on 06 Feb 2019 |
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Bravecto is the revolutionary tablet that packs three months of flea and tick protection into a chewable treat.  When it comes to our four-legged friends, we want to give them the best flea and tick protection possible. For many pet owners, that means giving Fido a regular dose of Bravecto. The first flea and tick treatment of its kind, Bravecto packs up to three months of pest protection into one tasty tablet. The powerful formula starts working almost immediately to kill adult and juvenile fleas, curing infestations fast and fighting future outbreaks. With such a powerful impact with each tablet, many pet owners wonder: Is Bravecto truly safe for dogs? Bravecto’s fast-acting and long-lasting efficacy is thanks to its active ingredient Fluralaner, an FDA-approved insecticide, and aracicide. After ingestion by your pet, Fluralaner enters the fluids under its skin, where it starts to work almost immediately to kill pests as they bite. This is thanks to its ability to attack the nervous systems of invertebrates such as fleas and ticks. Because Fluralaner is more effective on invertebrates than mammals, field tests and clinical use have found Bravecto to be safe for dogs. Fluralaner’s effectiveness comes from disrupting certain pathways in invertebrates’ nervous systems, creating waves of nerve transmissions that lead to seizure activity that is fatal to fleas and ticks. This has caused some concern among pet owners that Bravecto can also affect their canines’ nervous systems. However, field trials revealed the most common side effects to be vomiting, lethargy, and diarrhea—all symptoms related to the gastrointestinal system, not Fido’s nervous system. When administered properly, Bravecto provides year-round protection from fleas and ticks with just four tablets, protecting your pet from diseases such as Lyme and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and allergic reactions that can cause infection. As with any flea and tick treatment, Bravecto should be given only as instructed on the package for your specific pet. Bravecto chews are available in five different strengths for dogs of every size, including puppies over six months and dogs weighing more than 4.4 pounds. Bravecto can be used in breeding, pregnant and nursing pets. The most common adverse reactions seen during clinical trials were mild and transient gastrointestinal effects, including diarrhea, vomiting, loss of appetite and drooling. Bravecto was found to kill more than 90 percent of fleas and ticks and to be an effective treatment for allergies caused by fleas.

How Does Bravecto Work?

 by ben on 30 Jan 2019 |
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Available in a tasty chew, Bravecto provides long-lastingrelief from fleas and ticks. The secret lies in its active ingredient Fluralaner, which provides almost immediate and safe protection from biting pests. The first flea and tick treatment of its kind, Bravecto packs a powerful punch into each tiny tablet. The secret to its long-lasting formula lies in the active ingredient Fluralaner, which protects your dog or cat from biting parasites for up to three months with each chewable treat. An insecticide and acaricide that attacks the nervous system of fleas and ticks, Fluralaner is the FDA-approved ingredient that gives Bravecto its almost immediate efficacy in the fight against biting pests. It starts to work almost immediately after ingestion by entering the fluids under your pet’s skin, where Fluralanerattacks fleas and ticks as they bite. This disrupts particular pathways in the invertebrates’ nervous systems, resulting in seizures that are fatal to fleas and ticks, but, because Fluralaner is more effective on invertebrates than mammals, it is safe for your companion. Fluralaner’s effectiveness comes from its ability to disrupt two major system in fleas’ and ticks’ bodies. The first are gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA-gated, channels, which play a role in dampening nerve transmissions and cause an overall relaxing effect in the body. Fluralaner disrupts this process, creating massive waves of nerve transmissions that cause uncontrollable seizures and ultimately fatal effects in fleas and ticks. This works in concert with Fluralaner’s effect on glutamate-gated channels, which help nerves send signals to other cells. Fluralaner opens these channels to increase nerve impulse transmissions, intensifying seizure activity and Bravecto’s effectiveness in the fight against fleas and ticks. Fluralaner has been proven to start killing fleas within two hours of ingestion. After entering the fluids under your dog or cat’s skin, its long-lasting formula continues to work for up to 12 weeks, preventing future outbreaks. Bravecto also kills and controls four species of ticks, protecting your pet from diseases including Lyme and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Fluralaner is more effective on invertebrates than mammals, making its powerful in the fight against biting parasites, but safe for pets to ingest. When undergoing field studies, the tablet was found free from life-threatening and other serious side-effects, though the most common side effects included diarrhea, flatulence, increased thirst and loss of appetite. The FDA approved Bravecto and dogs as young as six months or as small as 4.4 pounds are safe for treatment, which is available in five different strengths for pets of every size. However, it’s important to tell your veterinarian if your pet has ever been diagnosed with a seizure disorder or experienced seizures. Because it is available in an easy-to-administer chewable treat and requires only four doses per year, Bravecto is one of the easiest and most effective ways to protect pets from biting pests.

Tips for Outdoor Flea Control

 by yunus on 22 Oct 2018 |
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A huge range of flea treatments is available these days, but sometimes infestations spread beyond the help of topical treatments. You can treat your pet for fleas religiously, but dogs with flea sensitivity will not respond to treatments unless they also include environmental controls. If your companion spends a good deal of time outdoors, it’s important to treat these areas to manage for fleas and other pests.   When making a list of steps you should take in addressing Fido’s outdoor flea problem, you should first account for which areas need treating. These should include any spot where your pet sleeps, such as his doghouse, kennel, carport, and even under the deck. Other areas to be treated include moist, shady spot where fleas breed; gardens; shrubs; and mulched areas. To rid these areas of fleas, many pet owners use pyrethroid sprays famous for killing fleas and ticks fast. These can be applied through a sprayer attached to a hose, allowing rapid treatment of large areas, or can be diluted and applied with a watering can on smaller spaces. Make sure to remove any pet or children’s toys before beginning this process.   Although pyrethroids are chemical imitations of pyrethrins—naturally occurring compounds that incapacitate insect nervous systems—not all pet owners are comfortable spraying them in their yards. Alternatives include desiccants, which are naturally occurring substances that pull water from fleas, causing them to dry up. Diatomaceous earth, silica gel, and sodium borate are all desiccants that can be applied in your yard to control fleas and other pests. Another natural solution to outdoor flea infestations are beneficial nematodes. Microscopic roundworms available at many garden centers, nematodes kill pests and other insects by entering the body and releasing a bacteria that kills fleas quickly. While they can be highly effective in some situations, nematodes have a limited area and season of usefulness, as they die in temperatures above 95 Fahrenheit and below 45, and are sensitive to light and drought. Cedar wood chips are another natural alternative to fighting fleas, as fleas are repelled by their scent. Sprinkle chips in shady areas, such as under the porch, and in dog bedding and outdoor furniture.   To keep a serious flea infestation at bay, repeat your outdoor treatment every two to three weeks, for at least six weeks. Once your pest problem is under control, you can drop to regular maintenance treatments every four to six weeks throughout the flea season. You should continue using your regular flea treatments on all of your pets throughout the process, and be sure to consult your veterinarian before treating your yard to make sure your pest prevention program won’t harm you or your canine companion.

Know Your Enemy (The Flea)

 by zack on 19 Oct 2018 |
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There is an unbreakable rule of war: Know Your Enemy. Know them inside and out, what their weaknesses are, their schedules, where they sleep, what they eat, and their greatest fears. To establish true mastery over a foe, one must become intimately aware of all that they are. Make no mistake, if you wish to win the war against parasites your greatest weapon will always be knowledge.  Knowing how a flea operates is the quickest and surest way to lead your enemy to an untimely and immediate end. Some Strange Facts about Nature’s Tiniest Vampires To know your enemy, you must first know what they do and where they do it. For example, did you know that most fleas spend nearly 80% of their time off of their host? They really only bed down on a playful pup or curious cat at meal time. Furthermore, once they’ve reached full maturity, they can survive up to 2 years between meals. That means treating your pet and its surroundings is the best way to keep flea bites at bay. The basic facts about fleas are obvious: excellent jumpers, they suck blood, flea bites are itchy, etc. However, there is much more to these insectoid Draculas than a shallow evaluation would suggest. There are over 2000 different varieties of fleas. These varieties are classified mostly for the type of hosts they inhabit. Strangely enough, fleas are like connoisseurs. They only go for one kind of prey, a sort of interspecies brand loyalty that even Apple executives would have to envy. Flea Bites Flea bites can significantly lower a pet’s quality of life. A flea bite has its obvious effect: a swollen itchy bump that can leave a pet tearing out chunks of hair in frustration. However, the damage it can do isn’t limited to an itchy inconvenience. Flea bites have been known to cause allergic reactions due to flea saliva, significant hair loss sometimes leading to Hotspots, and in rare cases even Anemia. Inhumane Treatment for Bloodsuckers There are two main types of treatment for eradicating fleas: Tablets and Topicals. Topicals are the preferred method of flea control for most pet owners due to the ease of application and overall efficacy. One drop of a topical will translocate across a dog or cat’s skin via the sebaceous system, (these are the glands that secrete oil in mammals,) and circulate through the animal’s blood stream as well, often killing intestinal or arterial parasites as part of the bargain. Tablets work by interrupting the flea life cycle. The prevent flea eggs from hatching into larvae. Once you’ve determined the best method for your pet you only need to point and click your way to a purchase at a reasonable price. Now that you know your enemy, it’s time to stop flea bites in their tracks and unleash the hounds, if you catch my drift. Pick up the spot on topical or tablet that best suits your pet today.  

Flea allergies in dogs

 by lucy on 27 Nov 2017 |
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All pets itch when they have fleas, but some dogs face severe allergic reactions to bites from these pests. From itchy, red bumps to hair loss and life-threatening infections, flea allergies can cause a host of worries for your canine companion. Fortunately, preventative flea treatments can stop allergic reactions and help keep Fido feeling his best.   Like people, dogs can be allergic to mold, pollen and dust mites. Pets with those allergies are likely to struggle with flea allergies, too. The allergy—formally known as flea allergy dermatitis—is a reaction of your dog’s immune system to fleas’ saliva when they bite. Infected pets will itch and gnaw at irritated areas, causing hair loss and open sores. A tell-tale sign your dog has flea allergy dermatitis is hair loss on the back half of his body, especially near the base of his tail, inner thigh, stomach and groin. Dogs with fleas will also have either visible bugs on their skin or “flea dirt” that can be readily seen. Because fleas can cause your dog to itch until he has open wounds, infested pets can also develop staph infections, which can prove fatal if they spread. Fleas don’t tend to cluster on animals’ feet or heads, so hair loss or itching in those areas is likely due to another problem.   The first—and most obvious—step towards treating your dog’s flea allergy is to rid him of fleas. A wide variety of flea control products available on the market kills the parasites through oral treatments, topical applications or long-lasting collars. Most flea medications are available in a quick, monthly dose, making curing and preventing infestations easier than ever. New flea treatments are developing constantly, so ask your veterinarian which medication will work best for your pet. Secondary infections from a flea allergy, such as bacterial or yeast infections, may require antibiotics or antifungal medication to heal. Some pets will also need anti-itch medication such as antihistamines or steroids during their recovery. In these cases, follow-up exams are often necessary to track progress of treatments. Your veterinarian can test your pet for flea allergies using blood tests or pinpricks, but the easiest way to cure the symptoms of a flea allergy is to eliminate the bugs.   Certain breeds such as terriers, labs and golden retrievers are more prone to flea allergies, so owners should be especially attentive when it comes to preventing fleas. If your pet starts licking, chewing, rubbing or rolling to try to relieve his itching, he may have a flea allergy. Look for red bumps and hair loss as further signs your pet needs help treating his symptoms— and remember, the easiest way to treat a flea allergy to is stop fleas before they strike with a preventative medication.

The Ultimate Flea Prevention Guide When Facing An Infestation in Your Home

 by ben on 19 May 2017 |
2 Comment(s)
We’ve seen dogs with fleas covering their entire bodies and cats that suffer from tapeworms caused by flea bites. Not only will these tiny pests torment your pets, they will also spread around your home and affect other family members too. Armed with the ability to multiply rapidly (up to 50 eggs per day!), you’ll have a hard time getting rid of them. While some pet owners are ill-equipped to deal with flea infestations, others simply don’t understand the urgency. Some of the common questions we get from our customers are: what do fleas look like? what problems or diseases will they cause? do they pose a problem to affect humans? how to check for fleas on my dogs and cats? where do they hide around my home? what are the best flea treatments? how to prevent another flea outbreak in the future? According to a pet health report done by Banfield Pet Hospital, fleas are the most common form of external parasites (even more than ticks). Since 2006, there has been an increase in flea infestation cases and they are concentrated in the south-eastern states. Besides potentially causing allergic reactions in the furry hosts, these nasty bugs can also pass on harmful diseases with zoonotic risk. Imagine how much you will have to pay for medical bills (vet & hospital) and pest control! That’s why we have gathered some of the best free resources around the web to answer your questions, and keep your pets (and yourself!) safe from flea infestations. Introducing The Ultimate Flea Prevention Guide This ultimate guide is a curated collection of blog posts, articles, and reports for any pet parents. You’ll learn what fleas are, problems they cause, how to identify them (in various places), how to remove and prevent them. Just click on the chapter you are interested in reading and the page will scroll to that section.   Contents Part 1: Fleas Essentials Chapter 1: Fleas and Their Life Cycle Chapter 2: The Danger Lurking Inside Fleas Part 2: How to Check for Fleas Chapter 3: Recognize the Symptoms on Your Family Members Chapter 4: The 411 on Fleas and Your Canine Companion Chapter 5: How to Spot Fleas on Cats Chapter 6: Where Do Fleas Hide in Your Home Part 3: Treating and preventing fleas Chapter 7: Treating Your Family Members Chapter 8: Flea Treatment and Prevention for Dogs Chapter 9: Flea Treatment and Prevention for Cats Chapter 10: Indoor, Outdoor, and Car   Part 1: Fleas Essentials Image Credit Chapter 1: Fleas and Their Life Cycle Do you know only 5% of fleas live in the environment as adults? The rest are in various stages of their life cycle. To avoid a relapse of infestation, you’ll need to understand their life cycles: What do fleas look like? | Orkin What’s the difference between fleas and ticks? | Pet Guide Types of Fleas | Ehrlich The life cycle of a flea | R.I.P Fleas The flea life cycle and how it guides effective flea control and prevention | Pet Informed Chapter 2: The Danger Lurking Inside Fleas Although flea itself is not lethal, its ability to host diseases is. Throughout history, fleas have been the main catalyst for major plagues, such as the infamous Black Death which devastated Europe during the 13th century: Dog flea diseases | Pet Basics from Bayer The Dangers of Fleas in Dogs | Pet Place Flea-associated illnesses in cats | DVM360 Fleas: A source of torment for your cat | Cornell University Diseases transmitted by fleas | Ehrlich What are the dangers of flea infestations to an infant? | Livestrong Plague: Ecology and Transmission | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Part 2: How to Check for Fleas Image Credit Chapter 3: Your Family Members Aren’t Safe Either Just as your pets are vulnerable to flea bites, so are your family members. Although humans are typically not flea’s natural host, they’re more than happy to feed on us. Keep an eye out for the symptoms: Can people get fleas from their pets? | The Bug Squad Can fleas live on people? | ThoughtCo Flea bite symptoms | Fleabites What does a flea bite look like on human | Fleas Be Gone Chapter 4: The 411 on Fleas and Your Canine Companion Dogs are one of the most common victims of fleas. Your canine companion may encounter them in the yard, on walks, at the groomer, or even in the house. It’s important to know how to check your dog and his environment for signs of infestation: How do dogs get fleas? | Animal Friends 5 ways to check your dog for fleas | PetBucket 3 simple ways to check your dog for fleas at home | Puppy Leaks What is flea dirt and what does it look like? | Petsho Chapter 5: How to Spot Fleas on Cats When people think of flea infestation on pets, they usually think about dogs only. Well, as the name suggests, the cat flea loves to feed on kitty cats just as much as they love to snack on dogs. This section will teach you how to check for fleas on your felines: How did my indoor cat get fleas? | Petcha How to tell if your cat has fleas | PetBucket Physical signs and symptoms of flea infestation on cats | Delightibles How to check cats for fleas: 13 steps (with pictures) | wikiHow Chapter 6: Where Do Fleas Hide in Your Home Fortunately, fleas leave behind a trail of evidence in their wake. From bites to flea dirt, there are many signs to look out for around your home: Where do fleas hide? | Long Time No Flea Do fleas live in grass? | Flea Science How can you detect a flea infestation? | Beaphar Flea inspection guide | DoMyOwn Part 3: Treating and preventing fleas Image Credit Chapter 7: Treating Your Family Members If you know what you’re looking for/at, it’s easy to spot flea bites on yourself or your family member. Take a close look at some pictures and detailed profiles of symptoms to ensure that you’ll be ready to remove and prevent fleas: Flea bites on humans: Symptoms and treatment | Den Garden Pictures of flea bites on humans: Symptoms and treatments | Get Rid Pests Flea bites on babies: Symptoms, causes, and home remedies | Flea Bites Info Chapter 8: Flea Treatment and Prevention for Dogs When it comes to prevention, we stock some great flea treatments (from popular brands) that can help keep your dog safe. We also included some natural preventive methods below as an alternative. A word of warning, you should always speak to a veterinarian before giving any treatments to your dog: Flea treatments for dogs | PetBucket Fleas: detection, treatment, & prevention | Cesar's Way Puppy flea treatment – Best practices | My Sweet Puppy Flea and tick medicine for puppies | American Kennel Club 6 ways to naturally prevent and get rid of fleas on dogs | Everyday Roots Chapter 9: Flea Treatment and Prevention for Cats We offer a wide range of flea treatments for feline too! Just as the case is with canines, there are alternative methods available for treating fleas on your cat. Again, always speak with a vet before making any final decisions: Flea treatments for cats | PetBucket Fleas on your cat? Here's how to handle the problem | The Spruce Pets Fleas and flea control in cats | International Cat Care How to safely remove fleas from kittens | Petful 5 natural ways to prevent & get rid of fleas on cats | Everyday Roots Chapter 10: Indoor, Outdoor, and Car Not sure how to go about getting rid of fleas in problematic areas outside of the house? We’ve got you covered. From the car to the dog bed, and back out into the yard, we’ve found you a comprehensive list of resource information on how to spot, remove, and prevent fleas in and around your home: Best ways of getting rid of fleas: A complete guide of effective flea control | Stop Pest Info How to de-flea your home | PetBucket Controlling fleas and ticks around your home | Environmental Protection Agency How to kill fleas in a home: 13 steps (with pictures) | wikiHow Your backyard wildlife habitat: Begin in spring to control fleas | Patch How to control fleas and ticks outside | WebMD Outside flea removal: In 4 easy steps | Fleas B Gone How to kill fleas in a car | Advantage Pest Control We hope our guide to flea prevention for your home. What did you think of the guide? Or maybe you still have an unanswered question. Feel free to let us know by leaving a quick comment below right now. Feature image credit
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